The Future of Energy

It Has None

“If somebody wants to build a coal plant, they can — it’s just that it will bankrupt them, because they are going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that’s being emitted.” [On the fact that existing coal plants will have to retrofit their operations.] “That will cost money — They will pass that money on to consumers.”

Words uttered by our putitive Commander in Chief, Barack Obama.  He said more, last January, in comments to the San Francisco Chronicle editorial board. “Under my plan of a cap-and-trade system, electricity rates would necessarily skyrocket.”  I’m sure they will.

They were going to go up regardless, but this is something else, by at least an order of magnitude. It is a call for punitive measures for energy producers and consumers, in the name of – here it comes – Global Warming, the great shiboleth.  Give him points for speaking the truth on this issue. Energy costs are going to go up drastically and dramatically in his administration, aided and abetted by a Democratic controlled Congress.  From Max Schulz in National Review Online

Obama promises that his cap-and-trade plan would shut down the industry that provides half the nation’s electricity. Running mate Joe Biden signaled similar sentiments in a rope-line gaffe a few weeks ago, when he pledged “no coal plants here in America” (despite the campaign’s official support for “clean coal” technology like carbon sequestration).

It’s unclear how Senators Obama and Biden would replace that lost power if we bankrupted the coal industry and closed down its plants.

There’s nothing unclear about it to me.  They’re simply not.

Addendum: Hot Air has the video, and wonders why the San Francisco Chronicle hasn’t mentioned this in ten months.

We get a nice mention from Hannity as his panel marvel at the fact that his remarks about forcing electricity prices to “skyrocket” never got highlighted by the Chronicle[.]

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Explore posts in the same categories: domestic, Global Warming, politics

2 Comments on “The Future of Energy”


  1. […] I posted earlier, I’m relatively pessimistic about our energy future.  Since we’re not going to […]


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